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Aransas National Wildlife Refuge: A Haven for Wildlife and a Destination for Nature Lovers

Updated: Jan 13, 2023

Introduction

The Aransas National Wildlife Refuge is a very special place. Located on the Gulf Coast of Texas, it sits just north of beautiful Rockport, Texas. It is the home and a federally protected area that is dedicated to the conservation and protection of fish, wildlife, plants, and their habitats. National wildlife refuges like Aransas are important for the protection and conservation of our world and our country's natural resources and biodiversity.


Established in 1937, the refuge has a rich history of preserving and enhancing the natural resources within its boundaries. They also provide recreational opportunities for the public to enjoy. It is a haven for wildlife and a destination for nature lovers alike.


In this article, we will explore its wonder, history, work, and legacy. Let's dive right in and learn more......

Aransas National Wildlife Refuge
Aransas National Wildlife Refuge



Overview of the Refuge

The Aransas National Wildlife Refuge also referred to as ANWR, is the largest managed Fish and Wildlife Service-protected area in the great state of Texas. Its jurisdiction spans three counties: Aransas County, Refugio County, and Calhoun County.


The Refuge is a federally protected wildlife sanctuary under the protection, direct supervision, and jurisdiction of The United States Fish and Wildlife Service (USFWS or FWS). It is an agency within the United States Department of the Interior. Which is dedicated to the management of fish, wildlife, and natural habitats in the United States. The mission of the agency is "working with others to conserve, protect, and enhance fish, wildlife, plants and their habitats for the continuing benefit of the American people.



U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service Seal
U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service Seal

The Federally Protected Refuge is made up of five units. Two of which (the Aransas and Tatton Units) are contiguous and located on the mainland. The Aransas Unit is the original part of the refuge. Its territory spans 47,261 acres, while the Tatton Unit is 7,568 acres. Then we have The Lamar and Myrtle Foester Whitmire Units which are smaller, respectively covering 979 acres and 3,440 acres.


The largest unit is the Matagorda Island Unit, which encompasses a 56,683-acre natural area that is managed as a unit of the Aransas National Wildlife Refuge and is an overlay to a state Wildlife Management Area. Texas Parks and Wildlife has the lead responsibility for public use management on the island, while the Aransas National Wildlife Refuge is responsible for wildlife and habitat management.


In total, the refuge covers 115,324 expansive acres.

Overview Map of the Aransas National Wildlife Refuge
Overview Map of the Aransas National Wildlife Refuge

ANWR features a diverse range of habitats, including oak uplands, grasslands, ponds, lakes, salt marshes, and freshwater marshes. This wide variety of habitats has contributed to the refuge's impressive species count. In fact, the Aransas National Wildlife Refuge has one of the highest species counts in the national refuge system. Making it one of the most biodiverse national refugees in the United States.





Taking all that into account, The Aransas National Wildlife Refuge is perhaps best known as the principal wintering ground for the only natural flock of whooping cranes in the world. These majestic birds make their way to the refuge each year, seeking out the warm, sheltered waters of the Gulf Coast as a respite from the colder temperatures further north. In addition to the whooping cranes, the refuge also attracts almost 400 other species of waterfowl and birds, including geese, ducks, pelicans, herons, egrets, gulls, sundial cranes, roseate spoonbills, ibises, quail, osprey, and a variety of migrating songbirds and shorebirds.






But the wildlife at the Aransas National Wildlife Refuge isn't limited to birds. The refuge is also home to a number of other species, including deer, javelinas (peccaries), armadillos, alligators, and turkeys. With so much diversity packed into one place, it's no wonder that the Aransas National Wildlife Refuge is a must-visit destination for anyone interested in experiencing the natural beauty of the Texas Gulf Coast.


American Alligator

Photo by Clinton & Charles Robertson from RAF Lakenheath, UK & San Marcos, TX, USA & UK, CC BY-SA 2.0
Photo by Clinton & Charles Robertson from RAF Lakenheath, UK & San Marcos, TX, USA & UK, CC BY-SA 2.0


History of the Aransas National Wildlife Refuge


The Aransas National Wildlife Refuge has a rich history dating back to the 1930s. The refuge was established as a wintering ground for migratory birds, particularly the whooping crane. It was created in response to the significant loss of wetland habitats and declining populations of migratory birds along the Gulf of Mexico flyway.


Photo by Robert W. Hines of Whooping Cranes
Photo by Robert W. Hines

On December 31, 1937, President Franklin D. Roosevelt signed Executive Order 7784 to establish the Aransas Migratory Waterfowl Refuge, a protected area for migratory birds and other wildlife to breed and thrive. In 1940, Roosevelt issued a proclamation changing the name of the refuge to the Aransas National Wildlife Refuge.


In the autumn of 1938, a group of young men and women from the Civilian Conservation Corps arrived in Austwell, Texas, ready to make a difference. They were tasked with building infrastructure and facilities for the newly established Refuge. They worked tirelessly to construct roads, ditches, and firebreaks, as well as residential facilities for the refuge staff.


One of the most impressive feats of engineering undertaken was the construction of the spillway for Burgentine Lake, a major resting area for migratory waterfowl. This impressive structure would help to regulate the water levels in the lake, ensuring that it remained a vital stopover for the many birds that passed through the refuge.


But the men and women didn't stop there. They also worked to improve the road connecting the refuge to the nearby town of Austwell, grading it and making it more passable for vehicles.


Through their hard work and dedication, these young men helped to lay the foundation for the Aransas National Wildlife Refuge, a place that would become a haven for countless species of fish, wildlife, and plants. Their legacy lives on today, as the refuge continues to serve as an important destination for those seeking to experience the beauty and diversity of the Texas Gulf Coast.





Prior to its establishment as a refuge, the land had been used for ranching and farming. In the early 20th century, the federal government began purchasing land in the area with the goal of establishing a refuge for migratory birds. The refuge was officially established in 1937 and has since played a vital role in the conservation and protection of wildlife and habitats along the Texas coast.


Throughout its history, the Aransas National Wildlife Refuge has undergone several notable changes and events. In the 1970s, the refuge expanded to include additional land, increasing its size to over 115,324 acres. In the 1980s, the refuge was designated as a critical habitat for the whooping crane, further solidifying its importance for the conservation of this endangered species. Today, the Aransas National Wildlife Refuge continues to be a vital location for the protection and conservation of a wide variety of wildlife and habitats.





Conservation

Today, the refuge is a part of the National Wildlife Refuge System, which administers a network of lands and waters for the conservation, management, and restoration of fish, wildlife, and plant resources.


Conservation and protection are key priorities at the Aransas National Wildlife Refuge. The refuge works with a number of organizations, including the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service and the Texas Parks and Wildlife Department, to protect and conserve natural resources within its boundaries. Efforts to enhance and restore habitats are also an important part of the refuge's mission. These efforts help to ensure that the resources at the Aransas National Wildlife Refuge are preserved and protected for future generations to enjoy.



In addition to its conservation efforts, the Aransas National Wildlife Refuge also plays a vital role in educating the public about the importance of protecting and preserving natural resources. The refuge offers a variety of educational programs for school groups and other organizations, as well as interpretive exhibits and guided tours for individual visitors. Through these efforts, the refuge aims to raise awareness about the importance of conservation and encourage the public to take an active role in protecting and preserving the natural world.


Photo by U.S. Department of the Interior, CC BY-SA 2.0
U.S. Department of the Interior, CC BY-SA 2.0

The Aransas National Wildlife Refuge is one such refuge that uses a variety of land management tools to preserve local plants and animals, including prescribed burns, wetland management, protection of native species, and trapping.


Prescribed burns are used to mimic natural fires that clear old vegetation, helping native plants regenerate and local wildlife thrive.


Photo by U.S. Department of Agriculture
Photo by U.S. Department of Agriculture

Wetland management involves adjusting water levels in moist soil impoundments to provide a habitat for wintering waterfowl and breeding mottled ducks.




The refuge also works to control invasive and exotic plant and animal species, and trapping is used to manage certain species populations for the benefit of the overall ecosystem. The refuge also offers recreational activities such as hiking and birdwatching, and it relies on donations and volunteers to support its mission.

 

The Whooping Crane


As we mentioned earlier in the article The Aransas National Wildlife Refuge is perhaps best known as the principal wintering ground for the only natural flock of whooping cranes in the world.





The whooping crane (Grus Americana) is a truly majestic bird, with its striking white plumage, distinctive red crown, and long, dark bill. Standing at an impressive height of up to five feet, it is the tallest bird in North America, earning it its name for the whooping sound it is known to make.



Sasata, CC BY-SA 3.0 <https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/3.0>, via Wikimedia Commons
Sasata, CC BY-SA 3.0 <https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/3.0>, via Wikimedia Commons

Unfortunately, the whooping crane is also an endangered species, having been pushed to the brink of extinction by unregulated hunting and loss of habitat. By 1941, there were just 15 wild and two captive whooping cranes remaining. However, thanks to conservation efforts, the total number of whooping cranes has now exceeded 800, including the surviving migratory population, as well as three reintroduced flocks and birds in captivity. These majestic birds make their winter home at the refuge, where they can be observed by visitors during their annual winter migration.





While adult whooping cranes are white with a red crown and a long, dark, pointed bill, immature birds are distinctive cinnamon brown. In flight, these birds are particularly impressive, with their long necks held straight and their long, dark legs trailing behind. The black wing tips of adult whooping cranes are also visible during flight.



U.S. Department of Agriculture, Public domain, via Wikimedia Commons
U.S. Department of Agriculture, Public domain, via Wikimedia Commons

Here, these birds rely on a diet that is largely comprised of blue crabs, which make up as much as 90% of their energy intake in some winters. This highlights the important role that the Aransas National Wildlife Refuge plays in the conservation and protection of these magnificent birds, as well as the diverse array of species that call this place home.


Their preservation has been due to a worldwide effort by conservation groups like the International Crane Foundation. An excellent organization dedicated to protecting and bringing back this great treasure. Other threatened and endangered species such as the Kemp's ridley sea turtle, and the American Alligator can also be found at the refuge as well.



National Park Service, Public domain, via Wikimedia Commons
National Park Service, Public domain, via Wikimedia Commons

Here is a complete list of all the different species found at the Refuge:



Recreational activities at the Aransas National Wildlife Refuge


The Aransas National Wildlife Refuge is also a destination for nature lovers looking to enjoy a variety of recreational activities. Visitors to the refuge can participate in outdoor activities such as hiking, birdwatching, and fishing. The refuge is also a popular location for kayaking, with several launch sites available within its boundaries.


In addition to these outdoor activities, the Aransas National Wildlife Refuge also offers guided tours and educational programs for visitors. These programs can provide a deeper understanding and appreciation of the refuge's unique wildlife and habitats. For example, the refuge offers guided bird walks and nature photography workshops, as well as educational talks and presentations.


While the Aransas National Wildlife Refuge is a great destination for recreational activities, it is important to remember to minimize the impact on the wildlife and natural habitats within the refuge. Responsible recreation involves respecting the refuge's rules and regulations, staying on designated trails, and leaving the area as you found it. By following these guidelines, visitors can help to preserve the beauty and natural resources of the refuge for future generations.


Admission to the preserve is free. Pets are not allowed. A trail map and guide are available here.


Check out our Calander of Events Page for special event Times & Schedules



How to support the Aransas National Wildlife Refuge


There are many ways to support the Aransas National Wildlife Refuge and its efforts to protect and conserve the unique wildlife and habitats within its boundaries. One way to get involved is to volunteer your time and skills at the refuge. The Aransas National Wildlife Refuge often has opportunities for volunteers to assist with tasks such as habitat restoration, trail maintenance, and educational programs.


Another way to support the refuge is to make a financial contribution. Donations to the Aransas National Wildlife Refuge can be used to fund conservation and management efforts, as well as educational programs and events. You can also support the refuge by becoming a member of the Friends of Aransas National Wildlife Refuge group. This organization is dedicated to supporting the refuge and its mission through a variety of activities and initiatives.


There are also many ongoing conservation and management efforts at the Aransas National Wildlife Refuge that the public can support. For example, the refuge is currently working to restore the habitat for the endangered whooping crane, as well as other threatened and endangered species. The refuge is also conducting research projects to better understand the needs and behaviors of these species, with the goal of improving their conservation efforts. By supporting these efforts, you can play a role in the protection and conservation of the unique wildlife and habitats found at the Aransas National Wildlife Refuge.


Getting to the Refuge



From the South: Follow Highway 35N to the FM 774 exit. Turn right on FM 774 and go approximately 6 miles, winding through the farm fields. Turn right again on FM 2040. Drive another 6 miles to the Refuge gate. Go to the Visitor Contact Station to register. 

From the North: Travel south on Hwy 35 to Tivoli. Continue past Tivoli approximately 1 mile to the FM 239 exit (on your left). Follow FM 239 to Austwell. Upon entering Austwell, FM 239 turns into FM 774 at the curve. Continue on FM 774. Follow 774 and take a right at the stop sign. At the end of the street, take a right again. As you exit Austwell, drive ½ mile to the FM 2040 intersection. Turn left on FM 2040 and drive 6 miles to the Refuge gate. Go to the Visitor Contact Station to register.

The GPS coordinates for the refuge’s main entrance are 28.313449, -96.804022.

Auto Tour and Trails Daily 30 minutes before sunrise - 30 minutes after sunset

Visitor Center Daily 9:00 am - 4:00 pm, Closed Federal Holidays



Conclusion


The Aransas National Wildlife Refuge is a unique and important destination that is home to a wide variety of wildlife and habitats. Located on the central coast of Texas, the refuge is a vital location for the protection and conservation of our country's natural resources and biodiversity. From the endangered whooping crane to the Kemp's ridley sea turtle, the refuge is home to many threatened and endangered species that rely on the refuge for their survival.


In addition to its importance for wildlife and conservation, the Aransas National Wildlife Refuge is also a destination for nature lovers to enjoy a variety of recreational activities, such as hiking, birdwatching, and fishing. The refuge also offers guided tours and educational programs, providing visitors with the opportunity to learn more about the unique wildlife and habitats found within its boundaries.


If you have the chance, we encourage you to visit the Aransas National Wildlife Refuge and experience all that it has to offer. And if you want to do your part to support the refuge and its mission, there are many ways to get involved, such as volunteering or making a donation. Every little bit helps to ensure that the Aransas National Wildlife Refuge remains a haven for wildlife and a destination for nature lovers for years to come.


To learn more about the Refuge and make plans visit their website


Who we are

The RockportFulton.com website is a comprehensive guide to the towns of Rockport and Fulton, Texas. The website provides a wealth of information about the local area, including events, activities, and attractions.



Arial View of the Rockport Texas Waterfront
Rockport Texas USA


Visitors to the website can find information about local festivals, markets, and events, as well as details about local businesses, restaurants, and accommodations. The website also features a calendar of events, so visitors can easily plan their trip and make the most of their time in Rockport and Fulton.


In addition to providing information about the local area.


RockportFulton.com is also a great resource for those who are interested in the history and culture of Rockport and Fulton. The website includes articles and photos that highlight the rich history of the towns and their unique character.


Overall, the RockportFulton.com website is an excellent resource for anyone planning a trip to Rockport and Fulton, or for those who simply want to learn more about these charming coastal towns.



The Town of Fulton Texas at sunset
The Town of Fulton Texas

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